Can I use copyrighted music on YouTube if I give credit?

Posted on Sat 14 May 2022 in Music

The fact is that unless your video is only for your personal use (as in, not sharing it online anywhere) you must get permission from the copyright holder to use any music on YouTube. This is the best way to not run into any copyright issues – but doing so isn't always easy.

Can you use someone else's music if you credit them?

Crediting the copyright owner, posting a disclaimer like "no infringement intended," or adding original content to someone else's content doesn't automatically make something fair use. Uses that try to substitute the original work instead of commenting on or criticizing it are unlikely to be considered fair uses.

When can I use copyrighted music without permission?

Fair use is a legal doctrine that allows a user to use portions of copyrighted materials for the purpose of commentary, criticism, reporting, teaching, and research without the need for permission from, or payment to, a copyright owner.

Can I use copyrighted music if I don't monetize?

The copyright owner decides whether they want to allow you to use their music. In most cases, the owners will be happy to let you use their music in exchange for putting ads in your video. Sadly, this means you won't be able to monetize your video.

How do you give credit to background music?

To give credit to a copyrighted song, you must first establish the identities of, and get permission from, the various copyright owners, such as the record label and the songwriter. You must then use specific words of credit, which vary depending on how you're using the copyrighted song.

You may have heard of "fair use," a copyright provision that permits you to use 10, 15 or 30 seconds of music without copyright obligation.

Can you use copyrighted music on YouTube without monetization?

You CAN use copyrighted music on YouTube, as long as you understand the rules. If a particular song is registered with Content ID, you will get a claim. It doesn't matter is that song is labelled “royalty free”, “no copyright”, or came from a music library.

Is background music fair use?

A: There is a concept in copyright law called “incidental use” that likely comes into play here. If you are able to demonstrate that your use of copyrighted material — in this case, the music playing in the background — was merely incidental, there is no copyright violation.

Can I sing someone else's song on YouTube?

Cover Song Licensing The song's copyright owner must give you a mechanical license if you pay a royalty fee based on estimated revenue from your cover song. You can obtain a mechanical license through the Harry Fox Agency. The mechanical license only covers the audio portion of your YouTube cover.